lgbtlaughs

will5nevercome:

My super-conservative devout Mormon parents (and society in general) have made a lot of progress toward acceptance since I first came out 11 years ago, and I’m genuinely grateful and impressed. But at the same time, I still feel a lot of hurt, and anger, and frustration at how far they (and society) still have to go. Sometimes it can be difficult to find balance between those extremes. It’s been mostly anger this week.

writing coach adventures: today there was an old man (A professor) sitting in the writing center when I arrived for my shift.  He had on a soccer game in Italian I think, and was grading papers. I a client due in, and he was like, can you go into another room and in my head I was like “How dare you this is the Writing Center” and I basically told him as much.  He left. 

beifonglover
comicsalliance:

‘FUN HOME’ CREATOR ALISON BECHDEL RECEIVES MACARTHUR GENIUS GRANT
By Chris Sims
Cartoonist Alison Bechdel is virtually a household name at this point. Her comics, including Fun Home and Dykes To Watch Out For, are deservedly critically acclaimed, and ‘The Bechdel Test’ has become an increasingly relevant shorthand for analysis of gender diversity in fiction. In other words, she’s a genius, and today, that became official.
Bechdel is one of the latest recipients of The MacArthur Foundation‘s “Genius Grant,” which honors “talented individuals who have shown extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a marked capacity for self-direction,” and comes with an award of $625,000 that can be spent any way the recipient sees fit.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

‘FUN HOME’ CREATOR ALISON BECHDEL RECEIVES MACARTHUR GENIUS GRANT

By Chris Sims

Cartoonist Alison Bechdel is virtually a household name at this point. Her comics, including Fun Home and Dykes To Watch Out For, are deservedly critically acclaimed, and ‘The Bechdel Test’ has become an increasingly relevant shorthand for analysis of gender diversity in fiction. In other words, she’s a genius, and today, that became official.

Bechdel is one of the latest recipients of The MacArthur Foundation‘s “Genius Grant,” which honors “talented individuals who have shown extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a marked capacity for self-direction,” and comes with an award of $625,000 that can be spent any way the recipient sees fit.

READ MORE

bluandorange

Early in my freshman year, my dad asked me if there were lots of Latinos at school. I wanted to say, “Pa, I’m one of the only Latinos in most of my classes. The other brown faces I see mostly are the landscapers’. I think of you when I see them sweating in the morning sun. I remember you were a landscaper when you first came to Illinois in the 1950s. And look, Pa! Now I’m in college!”

But I didn’t.

I just said, “No, Pa. There’s a few Latinos, mostly Puerto Rican, few Mexicans. But all the landscapers are Mexican.”

My dad responded, “¡Salúdelos, m’ijo!”

So when I walked by the Mexican men landscaping each morning, I said, “Buenos días.”

Recently, I realized what my dad really meant. I remembered learning the Mexican, or Latin American, tradition of greeting people when one enters a room. In my Mexican family, my parents taught me to be “bien educado” by greeting people who were in a room already when I entered. The tradition puts the responsibility of the person who arrives to greet those already there. If I didn’t follow the rule as a kid, my parents admonished me with a back handed slap on my back and the not-so-subtle hint: “¡Saluda!”

I caught myself tapping my 8-year-old son’s back the other day when he didn’t greet one of our friends: “Adrian! ¡Saluda!”

However, many of my white colleagues over the years followed a different tradition of ignorance. “Maleducados,” ol’ school Mexican grandmothers would call them.

But this Mexican tradition is not about the greeting—it’s about the acknowledgment. Greeting people when you enter a room is about acknowledging other people’s presence and showing them that you don’t consider yourself superior to them.

When I thought back to the conversation between my dad and me in 1990, I realized that my dad was not ordering me to greet the Mexican landscapers with a “Good morning.”

Instead, my father wanted me to acknowledge them, to always acknowledge people who work with their hands like he had done as a farm worker, a landscaper, a mechanic. My father with a 3rd grade education wanted me to work with my mind but never wanted me to think myself superior because I earned a college degree and others didn’t.